Parshat Vayechi • Genesis 47:28–50:26

As Sir Thomas More languished in the Tower of London awaiting almost certain death, he penned a meditation on the meaning of life and ordering of priorities. In his eloquent and transcendent expression, he intones:
“To think my worst enemies my best friends, for the brethren of Joseph could never have done him so much good with their love and favor as they did him with their malice and hatred.”

This was a powerful rationalization of even the most malicious machinations of his enemies as fodder for necessary growth and a singular realization of God’s larger vision and will. In this week’s portion, Vayechi, Jacob dies, and the guilt-ridden sons believe that Joseph will finally drop the hammer of revenge upon them in the absence of paternal judgment. But Joseph again affirms his capacity to rise above recrimination, a sure sign that he as evolved into a judicious leader. He asserts that God intended what happened to be for good and life, and offers the rhetorical and spiritual humility: “Fear not, for am I in the place of God?”

For those of us who find it difficult to let go, to loosen hold on grudges, or to see our acts as part of a larger, more enduring purpose, More’s meditation coupled with Joseph’s divinely configured forgiveness are inspiring guides to a better, less fraught life.

Rabbi Daniel Weiner