Parshat Chukat • Numbers 19:1 – 22:1

Rabbi Mitchell Cohen writes: “Perhaps one of the laws of Judaism that seems most distant and irrelevant in modern times is the idea of ritual contamination emanating from a corpse. Corpse defilement, as outlined in Leviticus 21 and elsewhere in Torah, is “cured” by the strange rituals set out in this week’s parsha, Chukat. We take the ashes from the parah adumah (red heifer), and create a strange liquid mixture to sprinkle on the people, vessels, and rooms that came into contact with the corpse. Within seven days, everyone is purified.”

Not exactly an easy ritual to explain — indeed, to some it might sound like a bit of a-religious ancient magic — and yet this ritual has staying power in Jewish consciousness. Those traditional Jews who pray for the dedication of the Third Temple while using modern science to clone a red heifer seek a type of purification they don’t believe possible without these trappings. As Reform Jews, we take a different tact. Spiritual purification comes from making amends bein adam l’haveiro, between people, and bein adam l’makom, between people and God. Perhaps it isn’t good material for DIG Episode 1, but this too needs staying power in the Jewish conscience.

Rabbi Aaron Meyer